It’s time for the weekend trip to the track. Was your bike loaded three days early? Probably. Did you pick your gear out over a week ago? Definitely. Is the cooler stocked? Absolutely. What else could you need?

If you think the bike, the gear, and the grub is all you need, then your weekend may be ending sooner than you think. Podiums and personal records depend on more than just how fast you hit the triples, and should disaster strike at the track, you’re going to need to make some on-site repairs to salvage your weekend. It could be anything from loose bolts to a full-on flat – no matter how big or small the issue may seem, you’re going to need some tools to keep your bike going at 100%. We’ve carefully compiled a list of 10 toolbox essentials, and even some of our most popular brands as a starting point. So, whether it’s time to update the trusty tool box or high time you got one started, make sure these 10 tools have a spot.

The Task: Loosening and Tightening Bolts and Fasteners

The Tool: T-Handles

Whether it’s the actual race or just a sight lap, something on your dirt bike is bound to get loose. It doesn’t matter if you’re just a weekend warrior rolling every triple either – even general riding necessitates general maintenance. You should be checking your bolts before every ride, and the best tool for the job is a T-Handle. These wrenches are designed to fit most fasteners on most dirt bikes, and their unique T-shape make them easier to use than the standard ratchet. T-Handles are a tougher, lighter, and more durable alternative to the standard ratchet, making them a convenience you don’t want to go to the track without.

Tusk Compact T-Handle Wrench Set Motion Pro Racer T-Handle Set Tusk 10 Piece Hex Key Wrench Set Tusk Deep Socket T-Handle Wrench
Tusk Compact T-Handle Wrench Set Motion Pro Racer T-Handle Set Tusk 10 Piece Hex Key Wrench Set Tusk Deep Socket T-Handle Wrench

The Task: Removing a Tire

The Tool: Tire Irons

If you’re not prepared for it, getting a flat at the track can mean the end of a fun day of riding or a DNS in your next Moto. Avoiding this ruining your next turn around the track is as easy as having a set of tire irons in your tool box. These tools help you remove your tire, which allows you to check for the leak, and either repair or replace your tube. You’ll need at least two tire irons to do the job, but some people prefer as many as three or four.

Tusk Tire Iron Kit Tusk Sure Grip Tire Iron Motion Pro Assorted Tire Irons Tusk Curved Tire Iron
Tusk Tire Iron Kit Tusk Sure Grip Tire Iron Motion Pro Assorted Tire Irons Tusk Curved Tire Iron

The Task: Checking Tire Pressure

The Tool: Tire Pressure Gauge

For the best ride, tires can’t be too hard or too soft, they need to be – you guessed it, Goldilocks! – just right. Riding on the wrong PSI can be detrimental, leading to you washing out, popping a tire, or just feeling uncomfortable around the track. Having a tire pressure gauge in your tool box can prevent all of that, there to let you know if you need to make some last minute adjustments. Most tires should be around 12-15 PSI for the track, but you can check your owner’s manual for suggestions and even adjust pressure in accordance with track conditions.

Tusk Pro Caliber Tire Pressure Gauge Tusk Low Pressure Tire Gauge Bike Master 2-in-1 Tire Gauge Tusk Low Pressure Dial Tire Gauge
Tusk Pro Caliber Tire Pressure Gauge Tusk Low Pressure Tire Gauge Bike Master 2-in-1 Tire Gauge Tusk Low Pressure Dial Tire Gauge

The Task: Adjusting Tire Pressure

The Tool: Air Pump

Checking tire pressure won’t be worth much if you don’t have the means to act on it. Checking tire pressure won’t be worth much if you don’t have the means to act on it. If your PSI is too low, you run the risk of your tire bead coming un-seated and popping off the rim – avoid this and get an air pump. We have several pumps available but, let’s be honest, even that dusty bicycle pump in your garage would suffice. With several sizes and styles made, you can pick the best pump for your tool box to be prepared for those last-minute adjustments.

Antigravity Batteries Micro Start Tire Inflator Slime Single Cylinder Foot Pump
Antigravity Batteries Micro Start Tire Inflator Slime Single Cylinder Foot Pump

The Task: Replacing Lost or Broken Bolts

The Tool: Bolt Kit

A kit of common bolts for metric bikes is genius, and it can save you at the track, too. Railing jumps and skimming whoops can do more than just jostle your current bolts (not to mention all of the times you case those jumps or lay it down in the whoops), and you can end a lap with a few less bolts than you started with. Lost or broken bolts can lead to more problems, too. Their absence places more strain on the other bolts, making it easier for them to subsequently break off or fall out. With a bolt kit on hand, you can take care of the broken or missing bolts right away, saving you from the headache – and mounting expenses – of replacing more than one bolt and maybe other parts, too.

Tusk 180 Piece Metric Motorcycle Bolt Kit Bolt Japanese Style Track Pack II 54 Piece Kit Bolt Japanese Style Track Pack II 100 Piece Kit Bolt Euro Style Track Pack 50 Piece Kit
Tusk 180 Piece Metric Motorcycle Bolt Kit Bolt Japanese Style Track Pack II 54 Piece Kit Bolt Japanese Style Track Pack II 100 Piece Kit Bolt Euro Style Track Pack 50 Piece Kit

The Task: Checking or Replacing the Sparkplug

The Tool: Sparkplug Wrench

A bad sparkplug makes for a bad ride and can be the cause of a whole host of issues. Some of the more unpleasant symptoms include poor acceleration, rough idling, and struggles even starting, but a lot of other common issues can also be attributed to a worn out sparkplug. No matter how pressing the issue seems to be, you’re going to want to check if it’s the small, inexpensive sparkplug that’s causing the trouble. You can check that with a sparkplug wrench, a tool that makes it easy to take the plug out and inspect it. You can even use the wrench to replace the sparkplug if it is indeed the culprit. The wrench is especially critical to have if you’re riding as two stoke (as those plugs go bad more often than a four-stoke), but it is useful to have for four-strokes as well.

Tusk Ratchet Spark Plug Wrench Tusk Spark Plug Wrench Tusk Spark Plug Socket Motion Pro Spark Plug Socket
Tusk Ratchet Spark Plug Wrench Tusk Spark Plug Wrench Tusk Spark Plug Socket Motion Pro Spark Plug Socket

The Task: Tightening Spokes

The Tool: Spoke Wrench

Before every ride, it’s vital to check your spokes and make sure they’re tightened. Loose spokes can affect your performance, especially if you’re consistently riding with them. If your spokes are too loose for too long, they can take your wheel out of true, thus affecting your steering and the longevity of your hub. That can lead to some shaky riding and pricey repairs, so it’s best to be proactive and keep a spoke wrench in your tool box. A quick turn around your spokes before every ride or race takes no time, but makes all the difference.

Tusk Spoke Wrench Set Motion Pro Ergo Spoke Wrench Tusk Spoke Torque Wrench Kit Tusk 6 Way Spoke Wrench
Tusk Spoke Wrench Set Motion Pro Ergo Spoke Wrench Tusk Spoke Torque Wrench Kit Tusk 6 Way Spoke Wrench

The Task: Chain Adjustments

The Tool: Axle Wrench

Another last-minute adjustment that often needs to be made is to your chain and, once again, the feature needs to be just right. Too much or too little slack could either break your chain or throw it through your case, neither of which is ideal. These mishaps are avoidable if you just adjust your chain before every ride, and that is easily done with an axle wrench. Compact convenience, the wrench can quickly loosen and tighten your axle nut, making chain adjustments as fast as they are easy.

Tusk Racer Axle Wrench Tusk Aluminum Tire Iron with Axle Wrench Enduro Engineering Trail Side Multi Tool Motion Pro T-6 Combo Lever Set
Tusk Racer Axle Wrench Tusk Aluminum Tire Iron with Axle Wrench Enduro Engineering Trail Side Multi Tool Motion Pro T-6 Combo Lever Set

The Task: Chain Adjustments, Loosening and Tightening Smaller Bolts and Fasteners

The Tool: Open End Wrench

An open end wrench is primarily used for making chain adjustments, its head perfect for moving the chain adjusting bolt. That being said, there are several instances where having an open end wrench can come in handy. Where T-Handles have the reach advantage, open end wrenches provide more twisting power, especially in those areas that T-Handles may not fit. The very design that makes T-Handles so unique makes them specialized to a few areas on your bike. For some little nooks and crannies, an open end wrench will be just what the doctor ordered. And, more often than not, you can buy the wrenches in sets, meaning you can get more than one and varying sizes to complete multiple tasks on your bike.

Motion Pro Ergo Wrench Set Motion Pro TiProlight Titanium Combination Wrench
Motion Pro Ergo Wrench Set Motion Pro TiProlight Titanium Combination Wrench

The Task: Clipping This, Clutching That

The Tool: Pliers

No tool list would be complete without pliers, which means no one should go to the track without them. While there aren’t too many tasks that require the use of pliers, they come in handy far more often than most other tools. Cutting off transponders, twisting wire, cutting tags off your fresh new gear – it’s all easier with a set of pliers. While you can check out the pliers that we sell for specific tasks, it’d also be great just to have a generic pair from any tool store tucked away in your box.

Tusk Master Link Clip Pliers Tusk Safety Wire Pliers Tusk Snap Ring Pliers Tusk Snap Ring/Circlip Pliers
Tusk Master Link Clip Pliers Tusk Safety Wire Pliers Tusk Snap Ring Pliers Tusk Snap Ring/Circlip Pliers

Got Some Extra Room?

If you’ve got the essentials, you’ll be prepared for a lot of what the track has to throw at you. That being said, don’t waste any extra room you may have and consider these helpful extras:

  • Tubes. You should have tire irons in your tool box no matter what, but they won’t be much help in repairing a flat if you don’t have an extra tube. And, do you want to know what’s more frustrating than getting a flat at the track? Pinching the only tube you have with you. That’s why, if you’ve got the extra room and cash, you should invest in a few tubes.
  • Stand. Having a stand for your bike at the track is a luxury you shouldn’t live without. Yes, you can prop your bike up against your truck or put it on a crate, but the easiest, most efficient, and safest place to keep your bike is on a stand. If you don’t have a lot of room, even a triangle stand will do the trick.
  • Mud Scraper. After a muddy moto, your bike can become unrecognizable.


Photo Credit: Kardy Photo

    Not only can your front plastics and graphics get covered, but mud can stick in all the crevices in your bike – under the fenders, under the skid plate, in the foot pegs, you get the gist. It’s not fun to hop on a muddy bike for a multiplicity of reasons, the primary being that extra mud equals extra pounds. Taking that extra weight to the track isn’t going to help you take any podiums, so it’s always nice to have a mud scraper on hand. These tools make it easy to remove excess mud from your machine, and can clean up the look of your bike before the next race.
  • Sparkplug. Small and light, sparkplugs fit right into any extra space. If you’re at the track and notice your plug is bad, you won’t have to stress about getting to a shop or stalling at the start gate – you’ll have a new plug and a wrench in your box, ready to go.
  • Filters. You don’t know what’s going to happen at the track and, for some of you, you probably also don’t know when the last time you changed your filters was. If you’re in for a weekend of long motos or laps around a dirty, gritty track, it’s “better safe than sorry.” Ideally, you would’ve checked your filters before you got to the track, but if you have some filters on-hand, you can make quick changes as needed.
  • Owner’s Manual. It never hurts to have an owner’s manual with you. If you’re forgetting some specifics or just want some advice, you can check its pages for torque specs, recommended tire pressure, and so much more. For even more in-depth information, you could also pack away a shop manual that has more room for detail than the standard owner’s manual.

Why It Matters

It doesn’t matter if you’re a seasoned pro or a total newbie, there are some tools that you should never leave home without. With this selection of wrenches, gauges, pumps, and pliers, you’ll be stocked and ready for whatever challenges the track may throw at you.


Photo Credit: Kardy Photo

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