Tire Information

Select your vehicle type below for machine-specific information on tire measurements, maintenance, safety, ratings and conversion charts.

ATV Tire Information

You'll never be charged for processing/handling fees on tires!
Get free ground shipping on tire orders over $75!

ATV Tire Search

Search by your quad's make, model and year. Browse all of our ATV tires and filter using brands, sizes, type or price range.

Build a Tire Wheel Package

Each tire/wheel package includes 2 tires mounted on 2 wheels.

Selecting New Tires

When selecting new tires, make sure they meet the requirements of your ATV and its expected usage. Always refer to the owner’s manual and tire manufacturer’s website for recommended tire size, construction, performance and suggested air pressure.

ATV Tire Measurements

ATV tires are commonly measured by Height x Width x Inner Wheel Diameter (HxWxID) in inches.

Tire Measurements

Term definitions:

Radial: Radial constructed tires utilize both ply and breaker (or belt) cords. The ply cords extend from bead to bead at approximately 90 degree angle to the centerline of the tire. The breaker (or belt) cords are placed on top of the ply cords across the width of the tire. Advantages: Adding breaker (or belt) cords results in a stiffer carcass which helps provide a longer tread and tire life, better steering control and handling, overall smoother ride and ride comfort, and higher tread puncture resistance.

Bias: Bias tires typically have the ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead at a range of 30 to 60 degree angles from the centerline. Each successive ply is laid at an opposing angle, forming a criss-cross pattern. Advantages: The design allows the entire tire body to flex easily, giving a comfortable ride on rough surfaces.

Wheel Measurements

ATV Wheel Sizing and Offset

To determine the diameter of a wheel: Measure the width of the bead area of the wheel (not the outer rim). In the diagram above, the diameter measures 12 inches.

To determine the offset and width of a wheel: Measure from the center weld to the center of the tire bead area on both sides of the wheel. The outer measurement will be the one with the valve stem. The offset of a wheel is stated by reading the measurement of the inside first, then the measurement of the outside (valve stem side). For example: In the diagram above, the offset is 5+2; meaning the inside half of the wheel measured 5 inches, and the outside (valve stem side) measured 2 inches. Add these 2 numbers together to find the total width of the rim (7 inches).

Note: If the rim has a tire on it, usually the tire will have the rim diameter imprinted on it (8", 9", 10"...). You can also measure the rim from inside using the diagram above and getting the measurements as close as possible.

Warning

The charts and info on this page do not imply interchangeability. Consult your machine’s manual to determine correct replacements, clearances, compatibility and stability, load-bearing capacity, speed rating, radial vs. non-radial recommendations, pattern and tread compound requirements, inflation recommendations and front-to-rear tire matching. Wrong selection can result in tire failure or loss of control with serious injury or death.

Common ATV Tire Terrain Types

All Around: Medium tread pattern for general use on various terrains.

Performance: Lower profile with tighter, aggressive tread patterns.

Sand: Paddled rear tires and smooth or ribbed front tires for great flotation and hook up.

Rocks: Heavy duty tires that usually have high ply ratings. Medium tread pattern.

Mud: Aggressive, wide and deep tread pattern. Heavy duty construction.

Snow: Aggressive, wide and deep tread pattern. Heavy duty construction.

Ply rating: ATV tires come in different ply ratings: 2-ply rating, 4-ply rating, 6-ply rating, 8-ply rating, etc. The higher the ply rating, the stronger (but heavier) the tire. For example: The most aggressive mud tires are built with higher ply ratings for ultimate strength.

Maintenance

Checking tire pressure is the most important tire maintenance function you can perform. Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good-quality gauge that holds a reading – and always before extended trips. Inspect tires frequently for damage, and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occur during the operation of your ATV.

Maintenance: Regular inspection of the ATV generally, and of wheels/tires in particular, is suggested because tire mileage and performance are adversely affected by a poorly maintained vehicle.

Sidewall treatment: Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering. Rinse off with plain water. Never apply any other material, cleaners or dressings to enhance sidewall appearance. These may degrade the rubber and remove inherent ozone-cracking/weather-checking resistance.

Tire storage precautions: The treatment that tires receive during extended periods of inactivity may directly affect their mileage and performance.

  • Temperature: Try to avoid frequent and varied extremes of temperature during storage. Do not keep tires next to radiators or sources of heat. Tires subjected to these conditions will age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Sunlight: Tires stored in direct sunlight for long periods of time will harden and age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Ozone: Do not store tires where electric motors are present. The high concentration of ozone will accelerate tire aging.
  • Oil and gasoline: Prolonged contact with oil or gasoline causes contamination of the rubber compound, making the tire unsuitable for use. Wipe off any oil or gasoline immediately with a clean rag. Do not use any tire that has been exposed to oil, gasoline, corrosives or non-rubber-compatible liquids.

Safety Precautions

Safety tips: Refer to your machine’s documentation for proper maintenance. Always give tires a gentle “run-in” period to get the feel of new tires. Always match the front and rear tires for optimal handling, safety and performance. Mixing radials with bias or belted-bias tires may adversely affect handling and stability. Worn/unworn tire combinations and worn tires used in wet conditions can result in deteriorated handling.

Inspection: Condition: Check for cuts and gouges that may cause air leakage. Also check the tires for missing knobs and excessively worn tread. Wheels: To avoid loss of control or injury, make sure axle nuts are tight and secured. Grasp each tire at the front and rear and try to rock it on its axle to detect worn-out bearings or loose nuts. There should be no free play or slip as you rock the wheel.

Tire mounting guidelines: Only specially trained persons should mount tires. Improper mounting can cause tire explosion and serious injury. Never exceed the tire manufacturer’s recommended maximum pressure when seating any tire. Never inflate above your tire manufacturer’s recommended psi amount to seat beads. Maximum pressure can be found on the sidewall of each tire.

Dirt Bike Tire Information

You'll never be charged for processing/handling fees on tires!
Get free ground shipping on tire orders over $75!

Dirt Bike Tire Search

Search by your bike's make, model and year. Browse all of our dirt bike tires and filter using brands, sizes, type or price range.

Selecting New Tires

When selecting new tires, make sure they meet the requirements of your motorcycle and its expected usage. Always refer to the owner’s manual and tire manufacturer’s website for recommended tire size, construction, performance and suggested air pressure.

Dirt Bike Tire Measurements

Dirt bike tires are commonly measured by in millimeters by Width / Aspect Ratio x Rim Diameter (inches).

Tire Measurements

Term definitions:

Aspect Ratio: The aspect ratio is the height of the sidewall in relation to the width of the tread. For example, on the tire size above, the aspect ratio is 90% of the tread width (the first number in the tire size), creating a 99-millimeter sidewall height.

Radial: Radial constructed tires utilize both ply and breaker (or belt) cords. The ply cords extend from bead to bead at approximately 90 degree angle to the centerline of the tire. The breaker (or belt) cords are placed on top of the ply cords across the width of the tire. Advantages: Adding breaker (or belt) cords results in a stiffer carcass which helps provide a longer tread and tire life, better steering control and handling, overall smoother ride and ride comfort, and higher tread puncture resistance.

Bias: Bias tires typically have the ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead at a range of 30 to 60 degree angles from the centerline. Each successive ply is laid at an opposing angle, forming a criss-cross pattern. Advantages: The design allows the entire tire body to flex easily, giving a comfortable ride on rough surfaces.

Dirt Bike Tire Conversion Chart

Metric

Inches

70/100x17

2.75x17

80/100x21

3.00x21

90/100x14

4.10x14

90/100x16

4.10x16

100/100x18

4.10x18

110/100x18

4.50x18

120/100x18

5.10x18

130/80x18

5.30x18

140/80x18

5.60x18

100/90x19

4.10x19

110/90x19

4.50x19

120/90x19

5.10x19

Maintenance

Checking tire pressure is the most important tire maintenance function you can perform. Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good-quality gauge that holds a reading – and always before extended trips. Inspect tires frequently for damage, and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occur during the operation of your dirt bike.

Maintenance: Regular inspection of the dirt bike generally, and of wheels/tires in particular, is suggested because tire mileage and performance are adversely affected by a poorly maintained vehicle. Refer to the owner’s manual for recommended suspension settings. Improperly maintained components and incorrect or unbalanced front fork pressures will affect stability. Low suspension pressure will generate excessive tire stresses.

Sidewall treatment: Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering. Rinse off with plain water. Never apply any other material, cleaners or dressings to enhance sidewall appearance. These may degrade the rubber and remove inherent ozone-cracking/weather-checking resistance.

Tire storage precautions: The treatment that tires receive during extended periods of inactivity may directly affect their mileage and performance.

  • Temperature: Try to avoid frequent and varied extremes of temperature during storage. Do not keep tires next to radiators or sources of heat. Tires subjected to these conditions will age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Sunlight: Tires stored in direct sunlight for long periods of time will harden and age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Ozone: Do not store tires where electric motors are present. The high concentration of ozone will accelerate tire aging.
  • Oil and gasoline: Prolonged contact with oil or gasoline causes contamination of the rubber compound, making the tire unsuitable for use. Wipe off any oil or gasoline immediately with a clean rag. Do not use any tire that has been exposed to oil, gasoline, corrosives or non-rubber-compatible liquids.

Safety Precautions

Safety tips: Refer to your machine’s documentation for proper maintenance. Always give tires a gentle “run-in” period to get the feel of new tires. This means they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt lean-over, hard cornering, etc. Always match the front and rear tires for optimal handling, safety and performance. Mixing radials, or mixing radials with bias or belted-bias tires, may adversely affect handling and stability.

Air pressure: Always maintain the recommended tire pressure for the type of motorcycle that is being ridden; check the owner’s manual. Underinflated tires may cause wheel damage when ridden on rocky, rough terrain and allow the motorcycle to squirm or wander on smooth, hard terrain. Overinflation may damage the tires and cause an unnecessarily harsh ride. To accurately measure tire pressure, use a standard tire-pressure gauge.

Inspection: Condition: Check for cuts and gouges that may cause air leakage. Also check the tires for missing knobs and excessively worn tread. Wheels: To avoid loss of control or injury, make sure axle nuts are tight and secured. Grasp each tire at the front and rear and try to rock it on its axle to detect worn-out bearings or loose nuts. There should be no free play or slip as you rock the wheel. Inspect wheels for broken or loose spokes and for cracks on the hub or rim.

Tire mounting guidelines: Only specially trained persons should mount tires. Improper mounting can cause tire explosion and serious injury. Never exceed the tire manufacturer’s recommended maximum pressure when seating any tire. Never inflate above your tire manufacturer’s recommended psi amount to seat beads. Maximum pressure can be found on the sidewall of each tire.

Signs you could need new dirt bike tires: The primary thing to look at with tires is the tread. Is it worn too short? Are the knobs rounded? Are they showing other signs of wear (like cracks)? If so, it might be time for new tires. Worn/unworn tire combinations and worn tires used in wet conditions can result in deteriorated handling.

Warning

The charts and info on this page do not imply interchangeability. Consult your machine’s manual to determine correct replacements, clearances, compatibility and stability, load-bearing capacity, speed rating, radial vs. non-radial recommendations, pattern and tread compound requirements, inflation recommendations and front-to-rear tire matching. Wrong selection can result in tire failure or loss of control with serious injury or death.

Dual Sport / ADV Tire Information

You'll never be charged for processing/handling fees on tires!
Get free ground shipping on tire orders over $75!

Dual Sport / ADV Tire Search

Search by your bike's make, model and year. Browse all of our dual sport / ADV tires and filter using brands, sizes, type or price range.

Selecting New Tires

When selecting new tires, make sure they meet the requirements of your motorcycle and its expected usage. Always refer to the owner’s manual and tire manufacturer’s website for recommended tire size, construction, performance and suggested air pressure.

Dual Sport / ADV Tire Measurements

Dual sport / ADV tires are commonly measured by in millimeters by Width / Aspect Ratio x Rim Diameter (inches).

Tire MeasurementsTire Measurements

Load Index This number represents the load-carrying maximum capacity at maximum pressure.

Example: 58 = 520 lbs. 69 = 720 lbs.

See the chart in the tire’s description on our website for information for that particular tire’s load ratings.

Speed Rating This letter represents the maximum speed under recommended load capacity

Example: S = 112 mph W = 168 mph

See the chart in the tire’s description on our website for information for that particular tire’s speed ratings. Note: A letter “Z” indicates maximum speed capability in excess of 149 mph and is usually displayed after the aspect ratio.

Term definitions:

Aspect Ratio: The aspect ratio is the height of the sidewall in relation to the width of the tread. For example, if you have a tire that is 110/80R-18, the aspect ratio is 80% of the tread width (the first number in the tire size), creating an 88-millimeter sidewall height. Note to remember: Width is in millimeters, aspect ratio is a percentage, and rim diameter is in inches.

Radial: Radial constructed tires utilize both ply and breaker (or belt) cords. The ply cords extend from bead to bead at approximately 90 degree angle to the centerline of the tire. The breaker (or belt) cords are placed on top of the ply cords across the width of the tire. Advantages: Adding breaker (or belt) cords results in a stiffer carcass which helps provide a longer tread and tire life, better steering control and handling, overall smoother ride and ride comfort, and higher tread puncture resistance.

Bias belted: A bias belted tire utilizes ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead (relative to the centerline) and a stabilizer belt across the width of the tire. Advantages: This type of tire provides a smooth ride that is similar to the bias tire but lessens rolling resistance due to the belt's increasing tread stiffness. The plies and belts are at different angles, which improves performance compared to non-belted bias tires.

Bias: Bias tires typically have the ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead at a range of 30 to 60 degree angles from the centerline. Each successive ply is laid at an opposing angle, forming a criss-cross pattern. Advantages: The design allows the entire tire body to flex easily, giving a comfortable ride on rough surfaces.

ADV Tire Conversion Chart

FRONT:

Metric

Alpha

Inches

80/90

MH90

2.50/2.75

90/90

MJ90

2.75/3.00

100/90

MM90

3.25/3.50

110/90

MN90

3.75/4.00

120/80

4.25/4.50

120/90

MR90

4.25/4.50

130/90

MT90

5.00/5.10

REAR:

Metric

Alpha

Inches

110/90

MP85

4.00/4.75

120/90

MR90

4.50/4.75

130/80

5.00/5.10

130/90

MT90

5.00/5.10

140/80

5.50/6.00

140/90

MU90

5.50/6.00

150/80

MV85

6.00/6.25

150/90

MV85

6.00/6.25

160/80

6.80/7.00

180/55

7.00/7.25

200/60

7.90/8.00

230/50

9.50

Maintenance

Checking tire pressure is the most important tire maintenance function you can perform. Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good-quality gauge that holds a reading – and always before extended trips. Inspect tires frequently for damage, and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occur during the operation of your dirt bike.

Maintenance: Regular inspection of the dirt bike generally, and of wheels/tires in particular, is suggested because tire mileage and performance are adversely affected by a poorly maintained vehicle. Refer to the owner’s manual for recommended suspension settings. Improperly maintained components and incorrect or unbalanced front fork pressures will affect stability. Low suspension pressure will generate excessive tire stresses.

Sidewall treatment: Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering. Rinse off with plain water. Never apply any other material, cleaners or dressings to enhance sidewall appearance. These may degrade the rubber and remove inherent ozone-cracking/weather-checking resistance.

Tire storage precautions: The treatment that tires receive during extended periods of inactivity may directly affect their mileage and performance.

  • Temperature: Try to avoid frequent and varied extremes of temperature during storage. Do not keep tires next to radiators or sources of heat. Tires subjected to these conditions will age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Sunlight: Tires stored in direct sunlight for long periods of time will harden and age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Ozone: Do not store tires where electric motors are present. The high concentration of ozone will accelerate tire aging.
  • Oil and gasoline: Prolonged contact with oil or gasoline causes contamination of the rubber compound, making the tire unsuitable for use. Wipe off any oil or gasoline immediately with a clean rag. Do not use any tire that has been exposed to oil, gasoline, corrosives or non-rubber-compatible liquids.

Safety Precautions

Safety tips: Refer to your machine’s documentation for proper maintenance. Always give tires a gentle “run-in” period of 100 miles to get the feel of new tires. This means they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt lean-over, hard cornering, etc. Always match the front and rear tires for optimal handling, safety and performance. Mixing radials, or mixing radials with bias or belted-bias tires, may adversely affect handling and stability.

Air pressure: Always maintain the recommended tire pressure for the type of motorcycle that is being ridden; check the owner’s manual. Underinflated tires may cause wheel damage when ridden on rocky, rough terrain and allow the motorcycle to squirm or wander on smooth, hard terrain. Overinflation may damage the tires and cause an unnecessarily harsh ride. To accurately measure tire pressure, use a standard tire-pressure gauge.

Inspection: Condition: Check for cuts and gouges that may cause air leakage. Also check the tires for missing knobs and excessively worn tread. Wheels: To avoid loss of control or injury, make sure axle nuts are tight and secured. Grasp each tire at the front and rear and try to rock it on its axle to detect worn-out bearings or loose nuts. There should be no free play or slip as you rock the wheel. Inspect wheels for broken or loose spokes and for cracks on the hub or rim.

Tire mounting guidelines: Only specially trained persons should mount tires. Improper mounting can cause tire explosion and serious injury. Never exceed the tire manufacturer’s recommended maximum pressure when seating any tire. Never inflate above your tire manufacturer’s recommended psi amount to seat beads. Maximum pressure can be found on the sidewall of each tire.

Minimum tread depth: Excessively worn tires are more susceptible to penetrations. Always remove motorcycle tires from service before they reach the tread-wear indicator bars (1/32 of an inch tread pattern depth remaining). Worn/unworn tire combinations and worn tires used in wet conditions can result in deteriorated handling.

Warning

The charts and info on this page do not imply interchangeability. Consult your machine’s manual to determine correct replacements, clearances, compatibility and stability, load-bearing capacity, speed rating, radial vs. non-radial recommendations, pattern and tread compound requirements, inflation recommendations and front-to-rear tire matching. Wrong selection can result in tire failure or loss of control with serious injury or death.

Motorcycle Tire Information

You'll never be charged for processing/handling fees on tires!
Get free ground shipping on tire orders over $75!

Motorcycle Tire Search

Search by your bike's make, model and year. Browse all of our motorcycle tires and filter using brands, sizes, type or price range.

Selecting New Tires

When selecting new tires, make sure they meet the requirements of your motorcycle and its expected usage. Always refer to the owner’s manual and tire manufacturer’s website for recommended tire size, construction, performance and suggested air pressure.

Street Bike Tire Measurements

Street bike tires are commonly measured by in millimeters by Width / Aspect Ratio x Rim Diameter (inches).

Tire MeasurementsTire Measurements

Load Index This number represents the load-carrying maximum capacity at maximum pressure.

Example: 62 = 584 lbs. 69 = 720 lbs.

See the chart in the tire’s description on our website for information for that particular tire’s load ratings.

Speed Rating This letter represents the maximum speed under recommended load capacity

Example: S = 112 mph W = 168 mph

See the chart in the tire’s description on our website for information for that particular tire’s speed ratings. Note: A letter “Z” indicates maximum speed capability in excess of 149 mph and is usually displayed after the aspect ratio.

Term definitions:

Aspect Ratio: The aspect ratio is the height of the sidewall in relation to the width of the tread. For example, if you have a tire that is 160/60R-17, the aspect ratio is 60% of the tread width (the first number in the tire size), creating a 96-millimeter sidewall height. Note to remember: Width is in millimeters, aspect ratio is a percentage, and rim diameter is in inches.

Radial: Radial constructed tires utilize both ply and breaker (or belt) cords. The ply cords extend from bead to bead at approximately 90 degree angle to the centerline of the tire. The breaker (or belt) cords are placed on top of the ply cords across the width of the tire. Advantages: Adding breaker (or belt) cords results in a stiffer carcass which helps provide a longer tread and tire life, better steering control and handling, overall smoother ride and ride comfort, and higher tread puncture resistance.

Bias belted: A bias belted tire utilizes ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead (relative to the centerline) and a stabilizer belt across the width of the tire. Advantages: This type of tire provides a smooth ride that is similar to the bias tire but lessens rolling resistance due to the belt's increasing tread stiffness. The plies and belts are at different angles, which improves performance compared to non-belted bias tires.

Bias: Bias tires typically have the ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead at a range of 30 to 60 degree angles from the centerline. Each successive ply is laid at an opposing angle, forming a criss-cross pattern. Advantages: The design allows the entire tire body to flex easily, giving a comfortable ride on rough surfaces.

Street Tire Conversion Chart

FRONT:

Metric

Alpha

Inches

80/90

MH90

2.50/2.75

90/90

MJ90

2.75/3.00

100/90

MM90

3.25/3.50

110/90

MN90

3.75/4.00

120/80

4.25/4.50

120/90

MR90

4.25/4.50

130/90

MT90

5.00/5.10

REAR:

Metric

Alpha

Inches

110/90

MP85

4.00/4.75

120/90

MR90

4.50/4.75

130/80

5.00/5.10

130/90

MT90

5.00/5.10

140/80

5.50/6.00

140/90

MU90

5.50/6.00

150/80

MV85

6.00/6.25

150/90

MV85

6.00/6.25

160/80

6.80/7.00

180/55

7.00/7.25

200/60

7.90/8.00

230/50

9.50

Maintenance

Checking tire pressure is the most important tire maintenance function you can perform. Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good-quality gauge that holds a reading – and always before extended trips. Inspect tires frequently for damage, and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occur during the operation of your dirt bike.

Maintenance: Regular inspection of the dirt bike generally, and of wheels/tires in particular, is suggested because tire mileage and performance are adversely affected by a poorly maintained vehicle. Refer to the owner’s manual for recommended suspension settings. Improperly maintained components and incorrect or unbalanced front fork pressures will affect stability. Low suspension pressure will generate excessive tire stresses.

Sidewall treatment: Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering. Rinse off with plain water. Never apply any other material, cleaners or dressings to enhance sidewall appearance. These may degrade the rubber and remove inherent ozone-cracking/weather-checking resistance.

Tire storage precautions: The treatment that tires receive during extended periods of inactivity may directly affect their mileage and performance.

  • Temperature: Try to avoid frequent and varied extremes of temperature during storage. Do not keep tires next to radiators or sources of heat. Tires subjected to these conditions will age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Sunlight: Tires stored in direct sunlight for long periods of time will harden and age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Ozone: Do not store tires where electric motors are present. The high concentration of ozone will accelerate tire aging.
  • Oil and gasoline: Prolonged contact with oil or gasoline causes contamination of the rubber compound, making the tire unsuitable for use. Wipe off any oil or gasoline immediately with a clean rag. Do not use any tire that has been exposed to oil, gasoline, corrosives or non-rubber-compatible liquids.

Safety Precautions

Safety tips: Refer to your machine’s documentation for proper maintenance. Always give tires a gentle “run-in” period of 100 miles to get the feel of new tires. This means they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt lean-over, hard cornering, etc. Always match the front and rear tires for optimal handling, safety and performance. Mixing radials, or mixing radials with bias or belted-bias tires, may adversely affect handling and stability.

Air pressure: Always maintain the recommended tire pressure for the type of motorcycle that is being ridden; check the owner’s manual. Underinflated tires may cause wheel damage when ridden on rocky, rough terrain and allow the motorcycle to squirm or wander on smooth, hard terrain. Overinflation may damage the tires and cause an unnecessarily harsh ride. To accurately measure tire pressure, use a standard tire-pressure gauge.

Inspection: Condition: Check for cuts and gouges that may cause air leakage. Also check the tires for excessively worn tread. Wheels: To avoid loss of control or injury, make sure axle nuts are tight and secured. Grasp each tire at the front and rear and try to rock it on its axle to detect worn-out bearings or loose nuts. There should be no free play or slip as you rock the wheel. Inspect wheels for broken or loose spokes and for cracks on the hub or rim.

Tire mounting guidelines: Only specially trained persons should mount tires. Improper mounting can cause tire explosion and serious injury. Never exceed the tire manufacturer’s recommended maximum pressure when seating any tire. Never inflate above your tire manufacturer’s recommended psi amount to seat beads. Maximum pressure can be found on the sidewall of each tire.

Minimum tread depth: Excessively worn tires are more susceptible to penetrations. Always remove street motorcycle tires from service before they reach the tread-wear indicator bars (1/32 of an inch tread pattern depth remaining). Worn/unworn tire combinations and worn tires used in wet conditions can result in deteriorated handling.

Warning

The charts and info on this page do not imply interchangeability. Consult your machine’s manual to determine correct replacements, clearances, compatibility and stability, load-bearing capacity, speed rating, radial vs. non-radial recommendations, pattern and tread compound requirements, inflation recommendations and front-to-rear tire matching. Wrong selection can result in tire failure or loss of control with serious injury or death.

Motorcycle Tire Speed and Load Ratings

Load Ratings

33

254 lbs

115 kg

34

260 lbs

117 kg

35

267 lbs

121 kg

36

276 lbs

125 kg

37

282 lbs

128 kg

38

291 lbs

132 kg

39

300 lbs

136 kg

40

309 lbs

140 kg

41

320 lbs

145 kg

42

331 lbs

150 kg

43

342 lbs

155 kg

44

353 lbs

160 kg

45

364 lbs

165 kg

46

375 lbs

170 kg

47

386 lbs

175 kg

48

397 lbs

180 kg

49

408 lbs

185 kg

50

419 lbs

190 kg

51

430 lbs

195 kg

52

441 lbs

200 kg

53

454 lbs

206 kg

54

467 lbs

212 kg

55

481 lbs

218 kg

56

494 lbs

224 kg

57

507 lbs

230 kg

58

520 lbs

236 kg

59

536 lbs

243 kg

60

551 lbs

250 kg

61

567 lbs

257 kg

62

584 lbs

265 kg

63

600 lbs

272 kg

64

617 lbs

279 kg

65

639 lbs

289 kg

66

661 lbs

299 kg

67

677 lbs

307 kg

68

694 lbs

314 kg

69

716 lbs

324 kg

70

739 lbs

335 kg

71

761 lbs

345 kg

72

783 lbs

355 kg

73

805 lbs

365 kg

74

827 lbs

375 kg

75

853 lbs

387 kg

76

882 lbs

400 kg

77

908 lbs

412 kg

78

937 lbs

425 kg

79

963 lbs

437 kg

80

992 lbs

450 kg

81

1,019 lbs

462 kg

82

1,047 lbs

475 kg

83

1,074 lbs

487 kg

84

1,102 lbs

500 kg

85

1,135 lbs

515 kg

86

1,168 lbs

530 kg

87

1,201 lbs

545 kg

88

1,235 lbs

560 kg

89

1,279 lbs

580 kg

90

1,323 lbs

600 kg

Speed Ratings

J

62 mph

100 km/h

K

68 mph

110 km/h

L

74 mph

120 km/h

M

81 mph

130 km/h

N

87 mph

140 km/h

P

94 mph

150 km/h

Q

100 mph

160 km/h

R

106 mph

170 km/h

S

112 mph

180 km/h

T

118 mph

190 km/h

U

124 mph

200 km/h

H

130 mph

210 km/h

V or VB

149+ mph

240 km/h

Z or ZR

149+ mph

240+ km/h

W

168 mph

270 km/h

Y

186 mph

300 km/h

UTV Tire Information

You'll never be charged for processing/handling fees on tires!
Get free ground shipping on tire orders over $75!

UTV Tire Search

Search by your machine's make, model and year. Browse all of our UTV tires and filter using brands, sizes, type or price range.

Build a Tire Wheel Package

Each tire/wheel package includes 2 tires mounted on 2 wheels.

Selecting New Tires

When selecting new tires, make sure they meet the requirements of your UTV and its expected usage. Always refer to the owner’s manual and tire manufacturer’s website for recommended tire size, construction, performance and suggested air pressure.

UTV Tire Measurements

UTV tires are commonly measured by Height x Width x Inner Wheel Diameter (HxWxID) in inches.

Tire Measurements

Term definitions:

Radial: Radial constructed tires utilize both ply and breaker (or belt) cords. The ply cords extend from bead to bead at approximately 90 degree angle to the centerline of the tire. The breaker (or belt) cords are placed on top of the ply cords across the width of the tire. Advantages: Adding breaker (or belt) cords results in a stiffer carcass which helps provide a longer tread and tire life, better steering control and handling, overall smoother ride and ride comfort, and higher tread puncture resistance.

Bias: Bias tires typically have the ply cords that extend diagonally from bead to bead at a range of 30 to 60 degree angles from the centerline. Each successive ply is laid at an opposing angle, forming a criss-cross pattern. Advantages: The design allows the entire tire body to flex easily, giving a comfortable ride on rough surfaces.

Wheel Measurements

UTV Wheel Sizing and Offset

To determine the diameter of a wheel: Measure the width of the bead area of the wheel (not the outer rim). In the diagram above, the diameter measures 12 inches.

To determine the offset and width of a wheel: Measure from the center weld to the center of the tire bead area on both sides of the wheel. The outer measurement will be the one with the valve stem. The offset of a wheel is stated by reading the measurement of the inside first, then the measurement of the outside (valve stem side). For example: In the diagram above, the offset is 5+2; meaning the inside half of the wheel measured 5 inches, and the outside (valve stem side) measured 2 inches. Add these 2 numbers together to find the total width of the rim (7 inches).

Note: If the rim has a tire on it, usually the tire will have the rim diameter imprinted on it (8", 9", 10"...). You can also measure the rim from inside using the diagram above and getting the measurements as close as possible.

Warning

The charts and info on this page do not imply interchangeability. Consult your machine’s manual to determine correct replacements, clearances, compatibility and stability, load-bearing capacity, speed rating, radial vs. non-radial recommendations, pattern and tread compound requirements, inflation recommendations and front-to-rear tire matching. Wrong selection can result in tire failure or loss of control with serious injury or death.

Common UTV Tire Terrain Types

All Around: Medium tread pattern for general use on various terrains.

Performance: Lower profile with tighter, aggressive tread patterns.

Sand: Paddled rear tires and smooth or ribbed front tires for great flotation and hook up.

Rocks: Heavy duty tires that usually have high ply ratings. Medium tread pattern.

Mud: Aggressive, wide and deep tread pattern. Heavy duty construction.

Snow: Aggressive, wide and deep tread pattern. Heavy duty construction.

Ply rating: UTV tires come in different ply ratings: 2-ply rating, 4-ply rating, 6-ply rating, 8-ply rating, etc. The higher the ply rating, the stronger (but heavier) the tire. For example: The most aggressive mud tires are built with higher ply ratings for ultimate strength.

Maintenance

Checking tire pressure is the most important tire maintenance function you can perform. Check cold tire pressure frequently with a good-quality gauge that holds a reading – and always before extended trips. Inspect tires frequently for damage, and always heed warning signs such as vibration, handling instability, rubbing or tire noise that occur during the operation of your UTV.

Maintenance: Regular inspection of the UTV generally, and of wheels/tires in particular, is suggested because tire mileage and performance are adversely affected by a poorly maintained vehicle.

Sidewall treatment: Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering. Rinse off with plain water. Never apply any other material, cleaners or dressings to enhance sidewall appearance. These may degrade the rubber and remove inherent ozone-cracking/weather-checking resistance.

Tire storage precautions: The treatment that tires receive during extended periods of inactivity may directly affect their mileage and performance.

  • Temperature: Try to avoid frequent and varied extremes of temperature during storage. Do not keep tires next to radiators or sources of heat. Tires subjected to these conditions will age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Sunlight: Tires stored in direct sunlight for long periods of time will harden and age more quickly than those stored in a cool, constant environment.
  • Ozone: Do not store tires where electric motors are present. The high concentration of ozone will accelerate tire aging.
  • Oil and gasoline: Prolonged contact with oil or gasoline causes contamination of the rubber compound, making the tire unsuitable for use. Wipe off any oil or gasoline immediately with a clean rag. Do not use any tire that has been exposed to oil, gasoline, corrosives or non-rubber-compatible liquids.

Safety Precautions

Safety tips: Refer to your machine’s documentation for proper maintenance. Always give tires a gentle “run-in” period to get the feel of new tires. Always match the front and rear tires for optimal handling, safety and performance. Mixing radials with bias or belted-bias tires may adversely affect handling and stability. Worn/unworn tire combinations and worn tires used in wet conditions can result in deteriorated handling.

Inspection: Condition: Check for cuts and gouges that may cause air leakage. Also check the tires for missing knobs and excessively worn tread. Wheels: To avoid loss of control or injury, make sure axle nuts are tight and secured. Grasp each tire at the front and rear and try to rock it on its axle to detect worn-out bearings or loose nuts. There should be no free play or slip as you rock the wheel.

Tire mounting guidelines: Only specially trained persons should mount tires. Improper mounting can cause tire explosion and serious injury. Never exceed the tire manufacturer’s recommended maximum pressure when seating any tire. Never inflate above your tire manufacturer’s recommended psi amount to seat beads. Maximum pressure can be found on the sidewall of each tire.